FALL 2017

Monday, September 25, 2017

Mapping New York City's Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Press

10:35 am - noon, 1 Pace Plaza, E318

New York City served as a thriving Spanish-language publishing center in the nineteenth-century, and many of the leading institutions of the Spanish-language press held offices in the neighborhood surrounding Park Row during its heyday as the center of the popular, English-language newspapers of the city. Yet, much of the history of New York’s Spanish-language press during that period remains understudied. With most of the sources for uncovering this history scattered (often spottily) across archives, few resources exist for engaging students with the early history of Latina/o writing in New York City.

The students of Prof. Chris Campanioni's and Prof. Kelley Kreitz's Latina/o literature courses will engage in a mapping workshop using StoryMap JS to recover the lost history of New York's nineteenth-century Latina/o press.

RSVP to kkreitz@pace.edu to visit her class for the workshop.

 

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Digital Humanities Pedagogy Workshop: Assignment Working Session for Instructors

3:25pm - 4:25pm , Babble Lab, 163 William Street, Room 1105

How can our classroom instruction help to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and creativity necessary for active democratic participation in our digital age? At this working group meeting for instructors throughout Pace University, we will compare notes on DH assignments already in use in our classes--or on assignment ideas yet to be developed. Our goals will be to share ideas, identify additional support that Babble Lab can provide, and to begin collecting a bank of sample assignments to be included on the Babble Lab website.

RSVP to kkreitz@pace.edu

 

Monday, December 11, 2017

Read Against the Machine

11:00am - noon in Prof. Johnson's "Introduction to Literature, Culture, and Media"

Making democracy work in the 21st century requires that we understand computers themselves as readers. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to concepts and methods associated with distant reading. Distant reading refers to the practice of readers “inviting software” to participate in the meaning-making process. Participants will collect textual data sets, create data visualizations, and interpret the machine’s reading in ways that both open and close interpretative possibilities. Participants should have access to a laptop computer and Internet.

RSVP to kkreitz@pace.edu to visit Prof. Johnson's class for the workshop.

 

PAST EVENTS

Tuesday, May 1st, 2017

Thomas Augst: "Spatial Humanities Workshop"

noon - 4:00 pm, 1 Pace Plaza, 2nd fl., Lecture Hall North

Thomas Augst, Associate Professor of English at NYU, will join us for a workshop on digital tools for historical and cultural research. 

Interested students and faculty, contact Kelley Kreitz, kkreitz@pace.edu.

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Sebastian Heath: "Digital Humanities in 3D: Examples from the Ancient World"

3:25pm - 4:25pm, 1 Pace Plaza, 2nd fl., Lecture Hall North

Sebastian Heath is an archaeologist working in the ancient Mediterranean, with a particular focus on how digital methods and technologies can influence and improve the study of material culture. At its broadest scope, his work asks to what extent digital representations of the ancient world have utility within research and teaching. His talk will focus on 3D modeling, particularly on animations of ancient sundials and painted surfaces, to explore how these representations can contribute to narratives of past human behavior and experience. Dr. Heath is currently Clinical Assistant Professor at NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Daniel Alarcón: "Telling True Stories in Sound: Behind the Scenes of Radio Ambulante"

Noon - 1:00pm, 1 Pace Plaza W614

Daniel Alarcón is the host of Radio Ambulante, an award-winning Spanish-language podcast distributed by NPR. Radio Ambulante uses long-form audio journalism to tell neglected and under-reported Latin American and Latino stories.

This lecture is part of our series on Digital Storytelling and Social Justice.